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Support Christmas Seals

History

You may also be interested in the theatrical play that tells this story. It's suitable for schools.

Since 1908, Canadians have made a difference in the lives of people with lung disease by supporting the Christmas Seal program.

The first Christmas Seals originated in 1903 when a benevolent postmaster named Einar Holboell in Copenhagen, Denmark was inspired to create the stamps to help children with tuberculosis (TB).

The campaign was even more successful than the postmen had hoped. The Danes bought four million of the stickers. With funds from the first two Christmas Seal campaigns, they built two hospitals for treatment of children. This was a turning point in the world history of public health. It was the beginning of the movement to get ordinary citizens to take part in fighting an infectious disease, one which at that time was the leading cause of death, outstripping even wars and famines.

In 1907 the idea crossed the Atlantic to the United States. By 1908, the campaign had reached Canada. Interested people in Toronto and Hamilton began Christmas Seal campaigns to build and support sanatoria, as TB hospitals were called back then.

The old Toronto Globe came promptly to their aid. Early in December, the Globe began running a daily story on the front page giving news of the campaign. The column was bordered by holly so that readers could easily spot it.

One story told how the children of 58 Toronto schools had sold 10,000 Christmas Seals. Another issue announced that out on the Prairies a new paper called the Regina Leader, had written to say its staff would sell the seals and send the money back for the sanatorium being built at Muskoka.

From Saint John, N.B. the Rev. G. A. Moore wrote to say that he and other volunteers would sell 8,500 and send the money to Toronto for the sanatorium.

That first year, the Toronto campaign brought in $6,114.25 and Hamilton citizens gave $1,244.40.

Year by year, other cities across Canada tried the Christmas Seal campaign as a means not only of raising money but of creating the awareness that tuberculosis could be controlled.

Finally, in 1927, it was agreed that the Christmas Seal campaign was to be the official method for tuberculosis associations to appeal to the public for funds. A national seal was established.

Christmas Seal campaigns have played an important role in public health.

At first, the money raised was used for the new and badly needed sanatoria. When these were established, Christmas Seal funds were used for TB prevention. The seals have paid for millions of Canadians to have chest X-ray or tuberculin tests. As a result, thousands of TB cases were discovered before disease spread to others.

Christmas Seals symbolize the grassroots support of Canadians that helped win the fight against TB.

Today, Christmas Seals are an essential fundraiser for The Lung Association nation-wide. The money raised is used to support world-class research, programs and services.

Celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2008, the venerable Christmas Seal continues to help all Canadians to breathe easier.

Help us celebrate!


Christmas Seals Play

The Canadian Lung Association will permit you to use this play for nonprofit purposes without requiring any royalties providing you notify the Lung Association of any productions or other use of the play.

Teacher's Notes

The play is designed to be read and/or acted by children. The purpose is to acquaint them with the origin of the Christmas Seal which was first used in 1903 in order to fund treatment for the disease tuberculosis, a respiratory ailment affecting children as well as adults. As a result of the funds raised by the annual Christmas Seals campaign of the Canadian Tuberculosis Association, later to become the Canadian Lung Association, TB was brought under control in Canada. The funds raised now support medical research, patient education and awareness programs for many other lung diseases such as asthma, emphysema, and lung cancer. Further support is given to the prevention of lung disease by reducing or eliminating tobacco use. It is hoped that teachers will use this play as a springboard to discussions on health and the benefits of taking care of your respiratory system. This play has been reproduced on a single page for ease of downloading and printing. It may be freely copied and produced in the classroom for nonprofit purposes, providing you inform the Canadian Lung Association of any use you make of the play.

Historical Background

Although the facts have been dramatized in this version of the story and characters have been added to help with the telling of the tale, certain truths remain. Einar Holboell, was a postman in the city of Copenhagen in Denmark. He came up with the idea of using stamps to raise funds for tuberculosis in 1903 after he had seen "two ragged little waifs" outside his window while he was sorting the Christmas mail. He is, in his own way, as much a hero as Terry Fox or Rick Hansen. He wasn't an athlete but he was able to convince his fellow workers and later King Christian IX to support his new idea.

At that time, tuberculosis was the leading cause of death in Denmark. More people died from the disease which they called the white plague or consumption, than from war or famine. Enough money was raised from the first two campaigns to build two hospitals for the treatment of tuberculous children. This was the first time in history that ordinary citizens involved themselves in fighting a dread disease.

Although tuberculosis has been brought under control in most developed countries, it is still the leading cause of death world-wide of all infectious diseases, killing three million people every year, many of them children. Today, it is estimated that 1.6 million Canadians carry the TB germ in their bodies and approximately 2,500 people per year actually contract the disease. Largely because of the funds raised by the Christmas Seal campaigns over the past 80 years or so, effective programs are in place to diagnose, treat, cure and prevent TB. However, we must not become complacent and forget about the threat of TB. There are increasing cases of TB which are resistant to the drugs we use to fight TB. If these cases spread, there could be a resurgence of TB. That is why the Lung Association continues to fight TB and is currently supporting research and programs to finally eliminate the disease.

CAST

Although there were no female letter carriers or courtiers in those days, any of the roles in this play could and should be played by either boys or girls.

Narrator

Einar Holboell - elder postman

Helle - poor child with TB

Erik - poor child with TB

Hans - younger postman

Folmer, Peder, Lief and Christian - letter carriers

King Christian - king of Denmark

Queen Louisa - queen of Denmark

nurse

SETTING

Early December 1903.

A snowy evening in Copenhagen.

The stage is bare save for a long table at center, a window frame up-left, and several chairs. The postman Einar Holboell enters humming (or whistling) the Christmas Carol "Deck the Halls with Boughs of Holly." He is a kindly man in his fifties. He carries several heavy sacks of mail and dumps them on the table and begins sorting the packages. After a moment, he looks at the audience.

Einar
Hello. How are you all today. I am fine. That is the way that most children start their letters and so I thought that I would start this play the same way.

(A narrator enters and sits on a stool placed down right. The narrator or story-teller is dressed in modern clothing.)

Narrator
The man who just spoke to you as Einar Holboell and he is a--- No! I won't tell you. You'll have to guess, but I'll give you a hint. He's definitely not an Astronaut because this is the year 1903 in the country of Denmark. There were no Astronauts at the time. (The narrator selects someone from the audience to guess Einar's occupation.) Anyway, Einar is a very important ---

Einar
Whose story is this anyway? Don't I get to tell any of it?

Narrator
Well there's no need to get all huffy about it. Go ahead if you think you know so much.

Einar
Well, I was there wasn't I?

Narrator
Aren't you ever going to start?

Einar
Well, I will and right now too. Once upon a time---

Narrator
Very original.

Einar
All right then, I won't tell them. I'll show them. (He returns to the packages on the table.) Look at this. (He shakes a large package.) I'll bet that Ole has carved that hobby horse that little Inger has always wanted. This is such a nice time of year. Of course any time is nice when you get presents. Children are so fortunate. They get wonderful presents. They get to go to school and the only work that they have to do is a few chores like cleaning their own rooms every once in a while. (Takes another package. This one has become unwrapped.) Look at this. Thomas, the shoemaker's son, will be disappointed if this beautiful sweater from his grandmother in Norway arrives at his house in this condition. It's nice isn't it? (He shows it to the audience.) I'd better rewrap it. (He gets back to work.)

Narrator
While Einar was busy sorting and repackaging the Christmas mail, two orphans named Helle and Erik, were passing by the post office and stopped by the window to catch a few moments of warmth out of the wind. They weren't about to receive any Christmas presents.

(The children enter. They are dressed in rags and the little boy is coughing.)

Helle
Stop your coughing Erik.please. Look, I found some money on the street! Two whole Kroner. We will be able to buy some soup for your cold. Then you will feel better. (She peeks in the window.) Oh look, there's the postman. Remember him? He always used to bring candy for us at our house before mamma became ill.

Erik
(Nods and breaks into a new fit of coughing.) He used to tickle my chin when I was very small. I remember. Oh, look at all the packages. They must be presents for---

Helle
Don't you even think about that. It won't do us any good. Now let's go. We have to find a place to sleep tonight.

Narrator
As you may have guessed, Erik didn't have a cold. He was much sicker than his sister thought he was. He had tuberculosis and in those days a great many people died from that disease. It was so terrible that it was known as the white plague.

Erik
I'm glad that you're here to take care of me Helle. Josef, in my class at school, always used to complain about his big sister. He said that she rolled him in a blanket once and then locked him in a closet for a whole day. I bet you wouldn't do that.

Helle
Don't make any bets little brother. When you get better I'll be glad to lock you up for a while.

(Erik starts coughing again. This attack is the worst of all. We can see Einar start as he hears the noise from inside the building. He goes to the window just as the two children disappear offstage.)

Einar
Children!! Children come back here. I can help you! Oh, fiddle! White plague. It's terrible that children should have to suffer before they're even grown. It makes me mad. (He addressed the audience once more.) Doesn't it make you mad? Yes, of course it does. Well it make me mad. I can tell you that for sure. Somebody should do something about it. It isn't fair that people like me can go around just as happy as can be and those poor children probably don't even have a bed to sleep in tonight. Somebody should do something about it.

Narrator
Somebody should do something. That's what they all say. That's why nothing ever gets done. Exactly which particular somebody do you mean?

Einar
I don't understand.

Narrator
Don't you? Think about it.

Einar
Oh, I see. You want me to do something about it.

Narrator
Did I say that?

Einar
What can I do about it. I'm just a postman. That's all I am. I can't feed the poor. I can't care for the poor. I can't care for the sick. I take letters and packages from one place and deliver them to another. (He lifts up a package.) You see this? Good news. It's from Mrs. Mangin's daughter. She's probably had her baby. And this. (He smells it.) I think that it must be a love letter. Beautiful perfume. And look. Isn't this sweet? A package from little Eigil Sorensen to his sister at the University. So that's what I do. Hm. this is very nice. Look here. Little Eigil drew a picture of a snowman to put on the letter for a stamp. (Einar sits down deep in thought.) Very nice.

Narrator
You are about to see something wonderful: the birth of an important idea.

(Enters Hans, a young postman who works with Einar.)

Hans
(Shakes off the snow and cold.) What a terrible night! It's not fit for dogs out there. Is there any tea Einar? I could certainly use some warmth on a cold night like this. As I was walking here from my home, I saw a party for Flora Koenig's engagement. It looked warm in there. I was tempted to go in but .when I delivered the invitations, I didn't see any for myself. .Are you going to join this conversation Einar or am I going to talk to myself for the rest of the evening?

Einar
I'll make us some tea. (He goes offstage for a moment.)

Hans
(To the Audience.) I love my job. I think that it's because I'm such a busybody. I like to know what everyone else is doing. The only trouble with me is that I talk too much and I hardly ever finish my rounds. Why just the other day, I was taking a letter to .

(Einar returns with the tea.)

Hans
Oh thank you Einar. That's nice. A warm cup of tea.

(Einar goes back to the table.)

Hans
Wait a minute! Aren't you going to talk to me? A fine friend you are. Here it is, the coldest night of the year and you can't even stop your work to have a cup of tea. (He notices Einar for the first time.) You don't look so well. Are you feeling all right?

Einar
To tell you the truth, I'm not feeling very much like conversation tonight.

Hans
Well if you don't feel like talking, you can listen. I'm sure that I can talk enough for the two of us.

(Pause)

Einar
Hans, I saw something terrible tonight and I can't seem to get it out of my mind.

Hans
Go on. For a change, I'll listen.

Einar
Outside the window this evening, I saw two children. Orphans they must have been or they wouldn't be out in such weather. One of them was ill. He was coughing very badly. I think that it must have been the white plague. They were dressed in rags that were much too thin for this cold. I went outside to ask them in so they could at least warm up by the fire but by the time I decided to do that, they were gone.

Hans
I know such children. There are far too many of them around these days. Somebody should do something about it.

Narrator
There they go again. Somebody should do something. Somebody should do something. I hate that.

Einar
Hans, I have a crazy idea. I think that there is something that we can do about it.

Hans
That's a crazy idea all right. What can we do? We don't have the money to take care of all the sick and homeless children in Copenhagen. I mean even if we were to .

Einar
You're not letting me tell you.

Hans
That's right. I'm always doing that. Go ahead.

Einar
(Begins to speak.)

Hans
I'll keep quiet.

Einar
(Begins again.)

Hans
I'll just listen.

Einar
(Shouts.) Haaans!!!

Hans
Sorry.

Einar
Look at this Hans. (He shows him the stamp that the little boy had drawn.)

Hans
I don't see what this has to do with---

Einar
Neither did I .at first. But, you see, I came across this letter right after I saw the two children. I kept on looking at the home-made stamp and I kept thinking of Eigil Sorensen drawing this cute little stamp in his warm living room and those two poor, sick children out in the cold. Then I thought, what if.what if we made a stamp of our own, just like Eigil did. We could put it on letters and packages, especially at this time of year and we could ask people to give a little money.

Hans
I think---

Einar
They could give whatever they wanted to or whatever they were able to give, and we could use their donations to help those children.

Hans
I think---

Einar
(He becomes excited by his own idea.) After all, isn't this the season for giving? I don't think people would mind paying a few extra pennies to help those less fortunate than themselves. Then we could build hospitals and oh, we could do so many good things.

Hans
Einar!!

Einar
Yes/

Hans
Nobody has every been able to interrupt me like that before. What has gotten into you. You hardly even let me say a single word.. And I'm glad because I think that you have come up with an absolutely wonderful idea.

Narrator
Hans and Einar talked through the night, both of them becoming more and more excited as the idea took shape. The next morning the other postmen arrived to find them fast asleep with papers and notes all around them. The mail never did get sorted.

(Enter four more letter carriers. Folmer, Peder, Lief and Christian.)

Folmer
Will you just look at that. Poor little babies asleep on the job. Those two must have been working far into the night.

Peder
I have no idea what they are doing but whatever it was, they weren't working. Look at the mess and the mail hasn't been sorted at all.

Lief
Not sorted! Not sorted! How dare they? How are we to make our deliveries and this the busiest time of the year too? Now we'll have to do their jobs as well as ours. I have half a mind to wake them right now and given them a tongue lashing.

Peder
I'm the supervisor. If anyone is going to wake those two it should be me. After all, I'm responsible. Those lazy louts!

Christian
I don't know about the rest of you but as far as I'm concerned we should let them sleep. In all the years I've known Einar, he has never been lazy and Hans is a good worker. He wouldn't neglect his work either. Let them sleep. They must have a good reason.

Peder
That's true enough. Let's see what's going on. (He goes to the table and grabs a handful of notes.) They've been drawing stamps. What does this say. (He reads.) "Help the needy. Buy Christmas Seals." This is nonsense. I'm going to wake them.

Christian
But.

Peder
Never you mind. This is my job. (He goes over to Hans and shakes him.) Wake up! (He then goes over to Einar and does the same.) You too, lazybones. Wake up!

(They wake with a start.)

Hans
Einar, I was dreaming about this beautiful place where children were gathering. It was a wonderful dream. Then this ogre came. He was terrible. He kept on screaming, "They are too happy. They have no right to be so happy." He was awful. He smelled like he had eaten a whale for breakfast. Then he started to shake me and shake me. Oh, it's you Peder. What are you doing here?

Peder
You were both asleep at the table. And the mail has not been sorted.

Hans
Never mind the mail. We'll all pitch in a few minutes and get it done. Listen to Einar. He has a wonderful idea.

Peder
We don't get paid for wonderful ideas. We get paid to sort and deliver the mail.

Christian
Don't be such a fussbudget Peder. You are taking your new job as supervisor far too seriously. Now sit down and listen until Einar is finished.

Peder
How dare you---

Erik
He's right Peder. Try to remember what you were like two weeks ago when you were just a postman like the rest of us.

Peder
But I am responsible for the---

Lief
I think we should all just sit down and relax. It's taking more time to argue about whether or not Einar is to be given permission to speak then it would have if Peder had agreed to hear him out. Let's face it Peder. You are outnumbered.

Peder
All right. (He sulks.) But be quick about it.

Narrator
So Einar told them of the children and of the stamp that little Eigil drew and finally of his idea to print stamps that would be used to raise money for the poor and sick children of Denmark.

Peder
It's illegal. You can't put a stamp on a letter without the approval of the King. Now we've heard him. It's a good idea but it won't work so let's all get back to work.

Christian
I agree with Hans. I think it is a wonderful idea. I'm sure that the King would agree. Well done Einar!

Erik
I don't know how you thought of that. I never think of such things.

Lief
You never think Erik.

Erik
I do too. Right now I am thinking that we should go and See King Christian and Queen Louise.

Lief
I was only teasing Erik. I apologize. I, too, would like to see this happen. There are too many children sick and starving in this nation. If we can help, we shouldn't hesitate. We should do it right now. Who can design the stamp? I'll work all day and night to deliver them.

Christian
I have a cousin who can make the metal plates for the stamp. I'll go over there right away. I'm sure he will help.

Erik
And my brother-in-law is a printer. He has never done anything useful in his entire life. It's about time he began.

Peder
It will never work. Now let's get the mail out to the people.

Einar
It's too late for this year. Most of the cards and packages have already been posted. Let's all meet right after the Christmas rush and plan this more carefully. Perhaps we had better get the mail out before poor Peder gets any angrier. If he gets any redder, he may blow the top of his head off.

Peder
That's the most sensible thing anyone has said all morning. I mean about getting the mail out. Now let's go.Let's go!!!

(Everyone begins to put the mail into bags.)

Erik
Well done Einar. I can hardly wait to get started. (He exits.)

Christian
Me too. (He follows Erik out the door.)

Peder
I'd better help or we'll never get this all done. Waste of time if you ask me. (He grabs a bag and exits.)

Lief
(Approaches Einar and Hans who are in the process of leaving.) I...never told anyone this before but.both of my parents and my younger brother were taken from me by tuberculosis. I lived by myself on the streets from the age of ten. I'm glad that you thought of a way to help. There were a lot of us on the streets. I'm certainly one of the lucky ones. Thank you. It will be good to do something about this terrible problem. (He solemnly shakes their hands and begins to exit.)

Hans
Don't thank me. It was Einar.

Lief
(Nods and exits.)

(Hans and Einar also take mail sacks and exit, leaving the narrator alone on stage.)

Narrator
Well, the postmen delivered the Christmas mail and began their planning. When they thought that they had all of the details ready, they put in a request to see the King.

(While the narrator speaks, the table is removed from the stage and two thrones are brought to center stage. The King and his Chief Minister enter along with five courtiers.)

King Christian
(To his Chief Minister.) What exciting news have you for me today? What is the business of the court?

Chief Minister
Well, Your Majesty, some of your royal postmen have put in a request to speak to you. I tried to get them to tell me what it was all about but they said they would speak only to you. If you ask me, it's probably a complaint about a lot of nonsense. Perhaps they think the mail is too heavy. (He laughs.)

Courtier #1
Too heavy. That's a good one. May be they should only deliver the mail when it's light out. (He breaks into laughter as well.)

(In a moment the entire court is laughing.)

Courtier #2
They could deliver the mail by candle light.

(A second burst of laughter engulfs the court. Finally it dies down.)

King Christian
Well, bring them in. We might as well find out what weighty matters are troubling them.

(This time the laughter is much louder than before. Courtiers #3 and #4 exit to bring in the postal workers. They enter almost immediately. The King and his court are still laughing. Einar and Lief have been chosen as spokesperson s and step forward, away from the others.)

Courtier #3
Presenting Einar Holboell and his fellow workers Your Majesty.

King Christian
So you are my hard-working postmen. May I first commend you for your valuable service to our kingdom.

Einar
Thank you Your Majesty. (He bows.) And thank you for agreeing to see us. I'm sorry if I don't do things right. I am only a simple postman and I don't know the proper behavior for court.

King Christian
Why, then I shall forgive you in advance. Please tell us what it is that is troubling you.

Chief Minister
Yes, we would all like to know what has brought you to the court.

Lief
An idea has brought us here Your Majesty. A wonderful idea.

King Christian
Well that's a good start. Much better an idea than a problem.

Lief
The idea is about a way to solve a problem; a terrible problem.

Chief Minister
Do you mean that you have come here to take away our jobs? It is up to us to solve all of the terrible problems of this nation. I wonder if you would be wise to stop right now before you insult us? If fact you have already insulted us. There are no terrible problems in this kingdom. We have solved them all. I think that you had better leave.

King Christian
That decision is not up to you Mr. Minister. I said that I would forgive them in advance and I shall. Go ahead please. Speak your piece. (He looks at his court.) And no more interruptions.

Einar
While I was sorting the Christmas mail, Your Majesty, I heard a poor child coughing with the white plague. I mean, here I was, warm, healthy and well fed and this child was in mortal danger. I saw a stamp drawn by a second child on a package he was sending to his sister and ---well ---putting two and two together I thought that it would be a good idea to give away special stamps at Christmas time and ask people to donate whatever they could to help those poor children.

Lief
People could put them beside the official stamps on their letters and packages as a symbol that they are willing to help those less fortunate than themselves.

Chief Minister
I don't like it Your Majesty. That would be admitting that we cannot take care of our own problems and that we have to ask the people for help.

Peder
I'm the Supervisor. I'm just here because these are my men but I want you to know that I told them from the very first that it was a ridiculous idea.

Courtier #5
I disagree, Your Majesty. I think that it would make the people feel good to help. Certainly we can't afford to do it on our own.

Peder
On the other hand, Your Majesty, I did think that it had some possibilities. That's why I'm here.

King Christian
Isn't anyone interested in what I have to say?

(The court immediately becomes silent.)

King Christian
I think that it is a very interesting idea. In fact, I think that it is a wonderful idea.

Peder
I really thought of it myself Your Majesty. I just didn't want to take all the credit.

Courtier #3
You're not supposed to interrupt His Majesty when he is talking.

Peder
Whoops! Sorry Your Majesty. I just wanted to set the record straight.

King Christian
On the other hand, what my Chief Minister says is true. The people may feel that I am asking them to do a job that I should be doing. I will think about this and I will let you know my decision. Thank you, all of you, for bringing this matter to my attention.

(Courtiers # 3 and 4 begin to lead them out.)

King Christian
Oh, a moment please. I think that, whoever it was that came up with this idea in the first place ought to be rewarded. That would be Mr. Holboell wouldn't it?

Lief
Yes, Your Majesty.

King Christian
It seems that your present Supervisor can't seem to make up his mind. Perhaps someone who's thoughts are clearer would be a better leader. (He addresses the Chief Minister.) Take care of it would you?

Chief Minister
Consider it done, Your Majesty.

(Courtiers #3 and 4 escort the postmen out of the chamber.)

King Christian
I think that I will have to turn down their request. After all, how could I admit to the people that the children are suffering and we have done nothing about it. Leave me now. All of you. This is a sad day.

(All of the courtiers exit. The King remains on this throne. After a moment, Queen Louisa enters.)

Queen Louisa
Christian. I am ashamed of you. I have never seen you make a decision that was more wrong in all of your days as King of this nation. I was curious as to why a group of postmen should want to visit you so I waited in the anteroom and listened. I listened most carefully, I must tell you that you are putting yourself and your popularity above the needs of your people.

King Christian
But Louisa---

Queen Louisa
I am ashamed of you. Here you are, presented with an idea that could save hundreds at no cost to the royal treasury and you turn it down. How dare you!

King Christian
I thought ---

Queen Louisa
Well then, don't think. Act. I want you to tell those fine citizens that you will do as they suggest. And furthermore, I want you to put your own picture on that stamp so that you will show the people how much you care about them.

King Christian
But the Chief Minister said...

Queen Louisa
He is a foolish man. The people will love you all the more for helping them without raising their taxes.

King Christian
They will, won't they? I never thought of it like that...you are right Louisa. As usual. I will do as you say, but I will not put my picture on that stamp. Your own lovely face will adorn the first Christmas Seal as a sign that we both endorse this idea.

Queen Louisa
Then let it be done.

Narrator
And so it was done and the Danish people loved the idea so much that they bought 4,000,000 of the seals in the very first year. With the funds raised from the first two campaigns, they started building two hospitals to take care of children with tuberculosis. (A desk is brought on stage and a nurse sits behind it.)

(Enter Helle and Erik. Erik looks much worse than before.)

Helle
This is where they told us to come Erik. They said that they would take care of you here.

Erik
What about you? You must be sick too. You have been coughing all winter.

Helle
I'll be all right. Don't worry about me. Just get better Erik. This is a hospital. They can make you well. I'll visit every day. (She hands the nurse a piece of paper and begins to cough herself.)

Nurse
(She has overheard the conversation.) No, you won't. I think that you had better stay and keep your brother company. You don't sound so good yourself. Just a minute. I'll fix the forms.

Narrator
In the second year, 1904, Norway and Sweden, Denmark's neighboring countries, offered their own seals to their people. And in 1907 Einar received a letter from America.

(Einar comes onstage holding a letter and reads.)

Einar
Dear Mr. Holboell, My name is Emily Bissell. I am writing to thank you for your wonderful plan to fight tuberculosis. I heard about it in a magazine article sent to me by a Mr. Jacob Riis, a Dane who now lives in America. And "The North American," a newspaper in the city of Philadelphia, helped me to sell the stamps.

Narrator
The campaign reached Canada the following year and through the years it has grown so much that today there are one hundred and three Christmas Seal organizations world-wide and the horrible disease tuberculosis has been stopped in its tracks.. That's the end Einar, you can say goodbye now and thank you. You have made a difference in the world.

Einar
(Waves.) Well, I have to go now so I'll stop. Yours truly, Einar Holboell. Goodbye. And thank you all for making my dream come true.

(Einar bows and the rest of the cast join him for the curtain call.)

CURTAIN