Who We Are

BREATHING PASSION AND COMPASSION. Our reason for being can really be summed up in one word: Breathe. It’s what unites us. It’s what inspires us. And it’s what keeps our community of physicians, scientists, clinicians, educators, administrators, volunteers and donors so committed— whether it’s searching for cures to lung diseases, teaching kids about the dangers of tobacco, or fighting for clean air. The Lung Association is the leading organization in Canada working to promote lung health and prevent and manage lung disease. We do this by funding vital research, pushing for improved treatments, smarter policies, or supporting patients in managing their health.

Through a strong federated model of 10 provincial organizations, a national office, and a partnership with the Canadian Thoracic Society, we are the go-to resource for patients, their families, caregivers, health professionals and the general community. At a national level, we provide trusted and reliable information online, lead advocacy and awareness efforts and a national research program. Non-profit and volunteer-based, we depend on donations from the public to support our mission.

Every day, we roll up our sleeves and grapple with the challenges of everything from asthma to the environment. We might come from different places and bring different talents to the table, but we are all here for the same reason: to ensure that no one has to ever struggle to breathe.

Our Shared Goal

To lead the way to breathing breakthroughs through research, policies and programs.

 

History

LUNG STORY SHORT. What a century it has been: from our beginnings as Canadian Association for the Prevention of Consumption and Other Forms of Tuberculosis to today’s identity as The Lung Association. From tackling the scourge of TB to dealing with the scare of H1N1. From a feisty band of volunteers to an unstoppable national force. How did we get from there to here? With passion, creativity and relentless determination. Not to mention a steady stream of volunteers, donors, and researchers with the bit between their teeth.

Much has been accomplished along the way. We were among the first to go after smoking as the country’s greatest preventable health risk. As a result, passengers now breathe easier on smoke-free trains, planes and buses; cigarettes carry graphic warnings; tobacco advertising is banned; and smoking is prohibited in workplaces and outdoor spaces. We also scored a landmark victory for breathers’ rights with the passing of the Environmental Protection Act that regulated emissions from vehicles and engines. But for all our success, a lot more needs to be done. That is why the Lung Association recently launched the development of a national respiratory research strategy, which will do much to alter the way we think about breathing. There is no doubt that this is a pivotal moment in our history.  We have the will. We have the wisdom. We have the experience. But we can’t do it alone.

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Page Last Updated: 05/12/2016